Levaquin Lawsuits Status Conference Took Place Yesterday

By April 29, 2011Uncategorized

A status conference for the federal Levaquin lawsuits took place yesterday. They planned to discuss the coordinated trial schedule that was brought up at the last status conference, among other things.

At the beginning of this month, the parties held a status conference where it was agreed that they would hold the next bellwether federal trial on May 31 of this year. They also discussed the next state lawsuit that is scheduled to reach a courtroom on June 20 of this year. The federal lawsuit is going to be the second Levaquin case to make it to court. The first one ended up with plaintiff John Schedin receiving $1.8 million. Schedin developed tardive dyskinesia as a result of taking Levaquin.

Also what was likely discussed at the Levaquin litigation status conference were scheduling deadlines for the next trial, which will pit plaintiff Calvin Christensen against Johnson & Johnson. The case, the second bellwether in federal litigation, was chosen by the defendants, whose privilege it is, traditionally, to pick bellwether cases from a pool of lawsuits.

Like most Levaquin plaintiffs, Mr. Christensen is elderly, and his participation in the litigation will demand certain accommodations that may pose logistical problems. These problems and solutions to them will likely have been discussed at the status conference.

Yesterday’s status conference took place at 2pm CDT. Judge John R. Tunheim presided over the conference. More than a 1,000 lawsuits were filed because of Levaquin side effects, with at least 1,500 more pending in the state court of New Jersey. The makers of Levaquin, drug giant Johnson & Johnson, is headquartered in New Jersey. Details on exactly what happened during the status conference are coming soon. One thing is certain: As the trial dates edge closer and closer, many plaintiffs will be waiting for the trial results in the hopes that a precedent will be set and Johnson & Johnson will be held liable for these injuries.